Meet 5 Women Who Are Making a Difference in Our Members’ Lives

By Chime Team
March 1, 2021
Chime is a financial technology company, not a bank. Banking services provided by The Bancorp Bank or Stride Bank, N.A.; Members FDIC

It’s Women’s History Month! And here at Chime, we’re celebrating by highlighting the women having an impact on the lives of our members. 

We asked which women were making a difference in our members’ everyday — both famous and not-so-famous. Here’s what they had to say.

“Michelle Obama” — Necole, a dental assistant in North Carolina

Along with several of the other members we spoke to, Necole named Michelle Obama as the No. 1 woman who’s improving this world for women everywhere.

“She stays above the negativity — and that’s what I try to do every day.”

 

“She has a grace about her that’s very inspiring,” Necole says. She admires how, even under fire, Obama has kept her head up and continued to help others better their lives. 

She’s also had an impact on Necole’s career as a dental assistant. As Necole explains: “She stays above the negativity — and that’s what I try to do every day.”

Knowing that many people dread the dentist, Necole does everything she can to ensure her patients have a good experience. “That’s why I love my job so much,” she says. “Because I get to turn a negative into a positive.”

 

“My daughter” — Tabitha, a mother in Illinois

Tabitha is a mother of three who lost her job due to the pandemic. In addition to her two teenagers, who are a “handful,” she has a 4-year-old daughter who’s battling a rare cancer called neuroblastoma. 

“There’s always going to be that silver lining and the sun’s going to shine.”

 

“She is my superhero,” Tabitha says about her youngest. “I’ve never seen somebody so strong and so happy and playful.” That’s despite being in and out of the hospital, getting poked at with countless needles, and even going through chemotherapy. 

Though the experience has been painful for their entire family, Tabitha says her daughter’s illness has actually made her less negative and more optimistic. 

“Watching her and her strength, and her ability to enjoy her life every day, has made me realize that not everything is as bad as it seems,” she says. “There’s always going to be that silver lining and the sun’s going to shine.”

“Taraji P. Henson” — Tyler, a childcare worker in Georgia

Award-winning actress Taraji P. Henson is known for many amazing speeches. But it was her 2016 speech at Women In Film that really hit home for Tyler, who works in childcare and is an aspiring influencer.

“keep going at it, working hard, and putting my best foot forward, because in the end, it’ll pay off.”

 

With the power of her words and story, Tyler says that Henson pushes others to follow their own paths, become their best possible selves, and, most importantly, “ignore the haters.”

Henson inspired Tyler to work harder at her YouTube channel, which she started back in middle school. Tyler began uploading videos more regularly and making other efforts to gain subscribers. 

“Even if I feel like nobody is watching my videos, I just go back to her speech about marching at the beat of your own drum,” Tyler says. Henson reminds Tyler to, in her words, “keep going at it, working hard, and putting my best foot forward, because in the end, it’ll pay off.”

“Kamala Harris” — Stephanie, a retirement specialist in Minnesota

To Stephanie, it’s Kamala Harris, America’s first female vice president, who’s making a huge difference — especially in the lives of girls of color. Stephanie says Harris is living proof that “you can achieve your dreams and your goals.”

It’s not just the younger generations whom Harris is inspiring, though; she’s inspired Stephanie, too. This January, at the age of 37, Stephanie became the first person in her family to graduate from college, receiving her bachelor’s in business administration. 

“Like, you can go as high as you want to go. Don’t stop.”

 

And while Stephanie credits her 16-year-old daughter for the motivation to get her first degree, she credits Harris for her desire to continue her education and pursue her master’s. 

“Just seeing Kamala when she made vice president made me want to go even further,” Stephanie says. “Like, you can go as high as you want to go. Don’t stop.”

“My mother” — June, a hairdresser in Connecticut

When we asked June who inspired her, she immediately thought of her mother — a woman who continues to make a difference long after her passing.

June’s mother had four children, the youngest of whom had Down’s syndrome. At the time her brother was born, June says it was common to send children with special needs to live in a separate facility, but June’s mother kept her brother at home. 

“My two sisters and I, we get our strength from her. She was a fighter.”

 

“My mother was such a strong woman,” June says. “She did everything.” She took care of all four children: cooking, cleaning, sewing, knitting, making everything by hand. And she kept going, even after her husband, and eventually her son, passed away. 

“I think of her all the time,” June says. “My two sisters and I, we get our strength from her. She was a fighter.” And when it comes to women, it’s fighters we need — keep reading for ways you can become one.

How to support the women in your lives

Whether you’re inspired by the women in your life or are an inspiring woman yourself — or both! — now’s the perfect time to amplify your knowledge of the women’s movement. By doing so, you’ll be better prepared to support the ongoing fight for equality. 

Covering everything from historical struggles to modern achievements, here are 12 fabulous resources to get you started on your journey:

  • Remember the Ladies: This brand new email newsletter offers a smart look at today’s headlines “through the lens of American women’s history.” 
  • We Should All Be Feminists”: In this powerful TED talk, author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie offers a rallying cry to feminists of all stripes. 
  • Dame Magazine: This outlet, which says it’s “for women who know better,” cranks out real journalism with a feminist lens. 
  • Gender Fair: Available as both a Chrome extension and mobile app, this tool allows you to easily see which companies support gender equality while you’re shopping online and in-person. 
  • The Guilty Feminist: In this humorous podcast, host and comedian Deborah Frances-White discusses feminism, as well as “the insecurities, hypocrisies and fears that undermine our lofty principles.”
  • Built By Girls: If you’re ready to give back, this organization offers opportunities to become a mentor to female or non-binary students.
  • “Hood Feminism: Notes From the Women That a Movement Forgot”: Read this book by author Mikki Kendall to get an important, intersectional view of feminism that’s often not covered elsewhere. 
  • The Ann Friedman Weekly: While it’s not about feminism per se, journalist Ann Friedman’s newsletter is a must-read for any women who care about the world.
  • Knock Down the House”: This 2019 Netflix documentary follows four women — including, yes, AOC — on the campaign trail. Though you already know how it ends, it still manages to be emotional and exciting. 
  • YWCA: This organization, whose mission is to “eliminate racism and empower women,” is a great place to support with a charitable contribution. Or, if you’d prefer an organization with an international focus, check out Equality Now.
  • She Should Run: As evidenced by the many Chime members who cited Obama and Harris, politics is one way to have a serious impact. This group helps women run for office; perhaps you or a friend should give it a thought! 

This Women’s History Month, we encourage you to take time to reflect on the women who are making a difference in your lives, and let them know how much they mean to you. Just like the women mentioned above, they deserve your support, encouragement, and love, this month and every month that follows. After spreading the love, use the resources above to continue the conversation — and keep fighting for the rights of women everywhere — long after March is over. 

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